Archives For Cara Meredith

 

Get a taste of this month’s best nonfiction books, by reading the following excerpts:

    [easyazon_image align=”left” height=”160″ identifier=”0525536515″ locale=”US” src=”http://englewoodreview.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/51JIFuURUZL.SL160.jpg” tag=”douloschristo-20″ width=”106″][easyazon_link identifier=”0525536515″ locale=”US” tag=”douloschristo-20″]Digital Minimalism:
Choosing a Focused Life
in a Noisy World[/easyazon_link]

 

Cal Newport

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[easyazon_image align=”left” height=”333″ identifier=”0310351847″ locale=”US” src=”http://englewoodreview.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/41LZkyYQ7WL-3.jpg” tag=”douloschristo-20″ width=”218″]An excellent memoir that released this month!
 

[ Read Our Review ]

We’re giving away FIVE copies
of this excellent new book:

The Color of Life:
A Journey Toward Love and Racial Justice
Cara Meredith

Paperback: Zondervan, 2019.
 
 
Enter now to win a copy of this book (It’s as easy as 1, 2, 3!) :

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[easyazon_image align=”left” height=”333″ identifier=”0310351847″ locale=”US” src=”http://englewoodreview.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/41LZkyYQ7WL-1.jpg” tag=”douloschristo-20″ width=”218″]Toward Greater Courage and
More Authentic Community
 
A Review of

The Color of Life:
A Journey toward Love and Racial Justice
Cara Meredith

Paperback: Zondervan, 2019
Buy Now:
[ [easyazon_link identifier=”0310351847″ locale=”US” tag=”douloschristo-20″]Amazon[/easyazon_link] ]  [ [easyazon_link identifier=”B07DT37ZDP” locale=”US” tag=”douloschristo-20″]Kindle[/easyazon_link] ] [  [easyazon_link identifier=”B07K7SPPJ9″ locale=”US” tag=”douloschristo-20″]Audible[/easyazon_link] ]

 
Reviewed by David Swanson
 
 
On October 1, 1962, James Meredith enrolled in the University of Mississippi for his final year of college. What should have been a straightforward process involving applications and recommendations was anything but easy. Riots broke out on campus two nights before the arrival of the 29-year-old incoming senior. The possibility of the first African American student at Ole Miss was significant enough to draw concerted opposition from the governor of Mississippi and intervention by Robert Kennedy, then the U.S. Attorney General. Reflecting later, Meredith, a veteran of the U.S. Air Force, remembered his time at the university as a war, one which he won by forcing the federal government to intervene to defend his civil rights. This was a war against white supremacy and Meredith was willing to lead the charge, no matter how violent the response.

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