Archives For Bob Dylan

 

Bob Dylan’s Best Albums

Compiled by Madeline Cramer

 

“I hold a beast, an angel, and a madman in me,” said Dylan Thomas (the poet who inspired Robert Allen Zimmerman to legally change his last name at 19), and perhaps Bob Dylan’s poetry and music has achieved its legendary, timeless status by encompassing those three parts of the human experience so well.
 

*** For a limited time, the ebook 
   The Gospel according to Bob Dylan
   by Michael Gilmour is only $1.99 for Kindle!

 
(Albums arranged in the order they were released… )
 

The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan 
(1963)

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#1:
The Ballad of Bob Dylan: A PortraitSurprised by Hope: Rethinking Heaven, the Resurrection, and the Mission of the Church

Daniel Mark Epstein

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Here are 5 essential ebooks on sale now that are worth checking out:
( Bob Dylan, Donald Miller, MORE)

Via our sister website Thrifty Christian Reader
To keep up with all the latest ebook deals,
be sure to connect with TCR via email or on Facebook

 

Bob Dylan All the Songs: The Story Behind Every Track

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“Not the Other Kind

A review of

The Gospel According to Bob Dylan:
The Old, Old Story for Modern Times .
By Michael J. Gilmour.

Review by Warren Hicks.


Gospel According to Bob Dylan - Michael GilmourThe Gospel According to Bob Dylan:
The Old, Old Story for Modern Times .
Michael J. Gilmour.
Paperback: WJK Books, 2011.

Buy now: [ ChristianBook.com
]

“There are only two kinds of music. Good music and the other kind”
-Duke Ellington

“All of these songs added together don’t even come close to my whole vision of life”
-Bob Dylan (quoted, 94)

As a child of the 1960’s and one who engaged the charismatic renewal of the 70’s as a teenager, I was very intrigued when this title came up for review.  I remember hearing the murmurings about Bob Dylan around my house, I even remember my dad and his friends playing Bob Dylan tunes on the guitar around campfires.  That didn’t seem so odd to me then, except that in looking back I know my dad and Dylan didn’t see eye to eye politically in those highly charged times of the 60’s.  Apparently, however, my dad, his friends and I recognized good music when we heard it.

Bob Dylan, with The Band, Chicago c. 1972 (Bob Kinney)

Bob Dylan, w/The Band, Chicago c.1972(Bob Kinney)

In The Gospel According to Bob Dylan, Michael Gilmour, associate professor of New Testament and English at Providence College in Manitoba, makes a persuasive case for Bob Dylan being a purveyor of the Gospel, that is ‘good news,’ even if today he doesn’t claim publicly the same sort of Christian fervor that he did during his Slow Train Coming, Saved and Shot of Love period of publicly espousing his ‘born-again’ Christianity.

Gilmour takes a long hard look at the body of Dylan’s work, spanning some 50 years and more then 30 albums, films, poetry and the 2004 publication of Dylan’s autobiography Chronicles: Vol. 1.

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“A Strong Argument for
Locally-Oriented Communities

A Review of
Harry Smith:
The Avant-Garde in
The American Vernacular.

Andrew Perchuk and Rani Singh, editors.

Reviewed by Chris Smith.

Harry Smith:
The Avant-Garde in
The American Vernacular.

Andrew Perchuk and Rani Singh, editors
.
Paperback: Getty Research Institute, 2010.
Buy Now: [ Amazon ]

Harry Smith - Perchuk / SinghI’ve been thinking a lot in recent months about a church community’s role in nurturing the local culture of its place (see, for instance, my review of Walter Brueggemann’s newest book Journey to the Common Good).  Most recently, I have been thinking about the idea of folk music – i.e.,  music that is distinctive to the people of a place – and its relation to the church.  It seems like there is a lot of good work to be done by churches in discerning a style of music that reflects the people of the place, and at the same time allowing the music of the church to be open to this sort of local folk music – which could come in the form of writing new songs or in the way old hymns or songs are sung or accompanied.  My understanding of what folk music is has been shaped to a large extent by the classic collection The Anthology of American Folk Music (AAFM), which was assembled in the early 1950’s by the eccentric artist and ethnographer Harry Smith.  As I was beginning to reflect more intentionally on the idea of folk music as it relates to the church, I happened to see that the Getty Research Institute had released a new biography of Smith, which will undoubtedly become the authoritative reference work on Smith’s life and work.  This book, Harry Smith: The Avant-Garde in the American Vernacular, reflects the broadness of Smith’s work as an artist and scholar: ethnographer, collector, bibliophile, visual artist, filmmaker, etc.  The book is divided into five parts, the first of which contains biographical essays, the subsequent four engage various aspects of Smith’s work (his films: “Heaven and Earth Magic” and “Mahagonny”; theAAFM”; and finally his use of collage).

The first part of the book is helpful for understanding Smith’s development as an artist, and provides a rich context in which the following essays on his work can be understood.  Smith was born in 1923 in Portland, Oregon and raised by his theosophist parents who encouraged him to explore all the sorts of esoteric philosophies, “which led to an early and ongoing fascination with unorthodox spirituality, comparative religion and philosophy” (16).  The picture that is painted here of Smith is one of a man of extraordinary intellect and endless curiosity who was well-connected with key and cultural figures of his time (especially the poet Allen Ginsberg), and yet much of his life was spent in – or on the edge of – destitution.  Several stories recounted here, for instance, depict Smith as a literal embodiment of Erasmus’ famous epithet: “When I get a little money, I buy books and if any is left, I buy food and clothes.”

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