Archives For Bicycling

 

Here are 5 Free Ebooks for Kindle that are worth checking out:

These were taken from Amazon’s Kindle Bestsellers List.

For most of these, I have no idea when (or if) the book will cease to be free…

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The Bicycle Diaries: My 21,000-Mile Ride for the Climate

By David Kroodsma

“This is the kind of adventure we need more of–someone actually taking what they know and carrying it out to the people who need to hear it. Pedaling a bike, and peddling the truth about the most important issue of our time.” –Bill McKibben

Contact us and let us know if this ebook is no longer free…

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Rita DoveToday is the birthday of former US Poet Laureate Rita Dove…
(and, of course, fitting that her birthday falls on the 50th aniversary of MLK’s “I Have a Dream” speech.)

Here is a poem of hers that appears in the delightful collection:

The Art of Bicycling:
A Treasury of Poems

Justin Daniel Belmont, Editor

Paperback: Breakaway Books, 2005.
Buy now:  [ Amazon ]

*** Books by Rita Dove






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“The Evolutionary Argument for Dr. Seuss”
Salon.com Reviews ON THE ORIGIN OF STORIES
by Brian Boyd

http://www.salon.com/books/review/2009/05/18/evocriticism/index.html

Why do human beings spend so much time telling each other invented stories, untruths that everybody involved knows to be untrue? People in all societies do this, and do it a lot, from grandmothers spinning fairy tales at the hearthside to TV show runners marshaling roomfuls of overpaid Harvard grads to concoct the weekly adventures of crime fighters and castaways. The obvious answer to this question — because it’s fun — is enough for many of us. But given the persuasive power of a good story, its ability to seduce us away from the facts of a situation or to make us care more about a fictional world like Middle-earth than we do about a real place like, oh, say, Turkmenistan, means that some ambitious thinkers will always be trying to figure out how and why stories work.

The latest and most intriguing effort to understand fiction is often called Darwinian literary criticism, although Brian Boyd, an English professor at the University of Auckland in New Zealand and the author of “On the Origin of Stories,” a new book offering an overview and defense of the field, prefers the term “evocriticism.” As Boyd points out, the process of natural selection is supposed to gradually weed out any traits in a species that don’t contribute to its survival and its ability to pass on its genes to offspring who will do the same. The ability to use stories to communicate accurate information about the real world has some obvious usefulness in this department, but what possible need could be served by made-up yarns about impossible things like talking animals and flying carpets?

Read the full review:
http://www.salon.com/books/review/2009/05/18/evocriticism/index.html

ON THE ORIGIN OF STORIES
Brian Boyd.

Hardcover: Harvard UP, 2009.
Buy now: [ Amazon ]


David Byrne Reviews PEDALING REVOLUTION
For THE NY TIMES

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/05/31/books/review/Byrne-t.html

 Full disclosure: I’ve ridden a bike around New York as my principal means of transport for 30 years, so I’m inclined to sympathize with the idea that a cycling revolution is upon us, and that it’s a good thing. Like Jeff Mapes, the author of “Pedaling Revolution: How Cyclists Are Changing American Cities,” I’ve watched the streets fill over the years with more and varied bike riders. It’s no longer just me, some food delivery guys and a posse of reckless messengers. Far from it.

That said, the revolution isn’t here just yet. Hedge fund managers and General Motors executives aren’t riding to work (though don’t laugh, they will), and this book is not likely to reach beyond the already converted, which includes me, other cycling advocates, and people in the city-planning and transportation universe. But the book is useful — for those of us who occasionally find ourselves on the defensive, Mapes provides names, dates, facts and figures. He details how cities from Amsterdam to Paris to New York to Davis, Calif., have developed policies encouraging cycling in recent decades, and how other towns are just beginning to make way for bikes. He lays out in an easily digestible way a fair amount of material on trip patterns, traffic safety and air pollution.

Read the full review:
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/05/31/books/review/Byrne-t.html

PEDALING REVOLUTION:
HOW CYCLISTS ARE CHANGING AMERICAN CITIES
Jeff Mapes.

Paperback: Oregon State UP, 2009.
Buy now: [ Amazon ]