Archives For Alex Joyner

 

We are proud to announce the release of the new ebook:

A Space for Peace in the Holy Land: Listening to Modern Israel and Palestine
Alex Joyner

Ebook: Englewood Review of Books, 2014.
Buy now:  [ Kindle ]

“In A Space for Peace in the Holy Land, Alex challenges Christians to bear witness to the space that God has opened in the world by the empty tomb of Jesus Christ, to pray and to work for the reconciliation of Palestinians and Jews in the Middle East, and to support those persons, institutions, and policies that will make for peace in this most contested place in the world. The vision that he presents does not allow us to succumb to frustration or ideological posturing, but challenges us to serve the work of reconciliation that God has entrusted to us through Jesus Christ.”
-Bishop Timothy W. Whitaker, United Methodist Church

“A Space for Peace in the Holy Land is a particularly helpful resource that sheds light on the conflict between Israel and Palestine. This little book is essential reading for any Christian who desires to understand and to be engaged in this conflict.”
– C. Christopher Smith, co-author SLOW CHURCH: Cultivating Community in the Patient Way of Jesus

 

Read the book’s introduction below…
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“Spending the Holidays with Bonhoeffer”

A review of
God Is in the Manger:
Reflections on Advent and Christmas
.
By Dietrich Bonhoeffer.


Reviewed by Alex Joyner

God is in the Manger: Reflections on Advent and Christmas
By Dietrich Bonhoeffer.

Translated by O.C. Dean, Jr.

Compiled and edited by Jana Reiss
Paperback: WJK Books, 2010.
Buy now: [ ChristianBook.com ]

“Life in a prison cell may well be compared to Advent: one waits, hopes, and does this, that, or the other – things that are really of no consequence – the door is shut, and can only be opened from the outside.”
–Dietrich Bonhoeffer quoted in God in the Manger (13)

GOD IS IN THE MANGER - BonhoefferThere is a deep hunger among us for more of Dietrich Bonhoeffer, the once and future prophet.  Bonhoeffer’s death in a Nazi prison camp in the waning days of World War II left the Christian community with one of its more evocative unfinished stories.  The German theologian was deeply engaged with the challenges of his day, but there is so much that seems contemporary about him in the 21st century.

He was a colleague and disciple of Karl Barth, and in many ways his theological kin, but Bonhoeffer addressed his environment in ways that created a more engaged, lived theology.  As he watched the Christian church around him capitulate to Nazi ideology, Bonhoeffer foresaw the impotence and crumbling of the religious institutional structure.  And when he wrote about a “world come of age” in which humanity had finally outgrown its need of religion, it was inevitable that later generations of Westerners would see it as a prescient observation of their own world.

Publishers are hastily trying to feed this hunger with a slate of books.  2010 has already seen the publication of a monumental, if flawed, biography by Eric Metaxas, Bonhoeffer: Pastor, Martyr, Prophet, Spy [Thomas Nelson].  Though Metaxas leaves the reader wanting more insight and less reporting, (and much less clichéd prose), his book does have the virtue of immersing us once more in the story of Bonhoeffer’s life and in large passages of his writing.  Also this year, Fortress Press has continued its slow rollout of volumes in the Dietrich Bonhoeffer Works with the publication of its 800-page volume 8, Letters and Papers from Prison.  Three significant films on his life in the last decade have also contributed to making Bonhoeffer one of the hottest theologians of the 21st century some 55 years after his death.

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“Given Realities of Our Fallen World

A Review of

Hard Times Come Again No More:
Suffering and Hope
.

By Alex Joyner.

Reviewed by Chris Smith.

Hard Times Come Again No More:
Suffering and Hope
.

Alex Joyner.

Paperback: Abingdon, 2010.
Buy now: [ Amazon ]

The length of our days is seventy years—
or eighty, if we have the strength;
yet their span is but trouble and sorrow,
for they quickly pass, and we fly away.

Ps. 90:10 NIV

[ Listen to Mavis Staples’s moving rendition of the title song… ]

The story of the fall in Genesis 3 reminds us that life will be difficult and painful in our fallen world.  This reality is one that for many decades we in the United States have found ways to suppress or to outsource to other parts of the globe.  Our labor-saving devices often do save us labor, but are we storing up even greater trouble for our children and grandchildren in the ecological consequences of generating the energy that these machines require?  We are too busy to make (or to learn how to make) our clothes and basic household items, so we search the globe for cheap goods made by people who are willing to do this sort of labor, often in substandard conditions.  Similarly, we buy all manner of processed foods that we do not know where they come from and that are filled with all sorts of substances whose effects on our bodies are questionable at best, and in some instances likely harmful.  Additionally, we face the massive, yet underexplored, emotional crisis created by our alienation from the land and from other humans, as we find ourselves interacting less and less with humans and more and more with machines and other technologies.  It is amidst crises of this sort, obesity, sweatshop labor, global warming, etc. – crises that very much have their roots in our avoidance of the pain and monotony of labor – that Alex Joyner has written his lovely new book Hard Times Come Again No More: Suffering And Hope.

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