Archives For Agrarian

 

Today (Feb. 7) marks the birthday of agrarian and theologian Norman Wirzba…

 
In honor of the occasion, we offer a series of our favorite brief video clips that introduce Wirzba’s work…
 

*** Norman Wirzba’s FOOD AND FAITH
was our 2011 Book of the Year!

 

Food for Thought:

Continue Reading…

 

Liberty Hyde Bailey

Tomorrow (March 15) is the birthday of one of my favorite poets, Liberty Hyde Bailey.

Bailey was one of the most prominent American botanists and horticulturalists of the early twentieth century.  He was also an agrarian writer and one of the fathers of the Country Life Movement, and yes, also a nature poet.

Here you can read some of his poems that have been posted on our site over the last 6 years:

 

 

DOWNLOAD A FREE COPY
of Bailey’s classic book THE HOLY EARTH

 
Here is the introduction to the newest edition of Bailey’s main collection of poems WIND AND WEATHER, in which I argue why Bailey’s voice is an important one for our times…
 

“The Prophetic Power of Poetry”

An Introduction to
Wind and Weather.
by Liberty Hyde Bailey.

Continue Reading…

 

An Unexpected Hybrid: The Environmental Agrarianism of Wendell Berry

A Review of

Wendell Berry and the Agrarian Tradition: A Common Grace

Kimberly K. Smith

Paperback: UPress of Kansas, 2003
Newly Released in Paperback!
Buy now:   [ Amazon ]

Reviewed by Sam F. Chamelin

 

With the establishment of every new farmer’s market and urban rooftop garden, the marriage of agrarianism and environmentalism becomes more an assumption than experiment.  In a different era, concerns about issues such as GMO’s and topsoil erosion would be considered divergent and unrelated subjects.  Increasingly, we see these topics related to one another in critical ways, and there is a deep hunger for communal living in an intentional place. Much of the enthusiasm for these movements can be attributed to the inimitable pen of Wendell Berry.  In Wendell Berry and the Agrarian Tradition:  A Common Grace, Kimberly K. Smith offers us a thoughtful roadmap to Wendell Berry’s environmental agrarianism.  If, in the 21st century, we assume an easy combination of these divergent DNA strands, it is because of Berry, as Smith notes, “If Berry’s ecological agrarianism doesn’t look particularly innovative to us, it is because he makes the marriage of agrarian and environmental though seem so natural that we assume agrarianism always implied ecological sensitivity – or that ecological sensitivity always implied support for family farming.”

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Hands
Liberty Hyde Bailey

[Today — March 15 — is the birthday of Liberty Hyde Bailey]

Liberty Hyde Bailey

 

This poem is from the collection:

 

Wind and Weather: Poems

Read the introduction to this collection by ERB Editor Chris Smith

 


 

DOWNLOAD A FREE COPY
of Bailey’s classic book THE HOLY EARTH

 

    Some hands go to the manicure
    To primp and polish and shine
    Some hands go to the velvet lure
    And some to the jewel shrine;
But these are the hands that hold the plow
The self same hands as of old and now;—
They are the hands that court’sy and perk
But these are the hands that do the work.

 

Continue Reading…

 

“For Farmers, For Landowners,
For Citizens and Neighbors

A review of
??American Georgics:
Writings on Farming, Culture and the Land
.
Brian Donahue, Sara Gregg, Edwin Hagenstein, eds.

Review by Rachel Reynolds Luster.


American GeorgicsAmerican Georgics:
Writings on Farming, Culture and the Land
.
Brian Donahue, Sara Gregg, Edwin Hagenstein, eds.
Hardback: Yale UP, 2011.
Buy now:  [ Amazon ]

American Georgics: Writing on Farming, Culture, and the Land, offers readers a concise and well-heeled collection of agrarian thought and writings from the founding of our Republic through the current wave, including speeches, essays, excerpts from novels, and poems. The writings in this volume trace the evolution of “the economic, political, social, and ecological dimensions of agrarianism” (372). Some of the authors will be most familiar to readers of agrarian writing including James Madison, Henry David Thoreau, and Wendell Berry; others, such as Jesse Buell, Louisa May Alcott, and Nate Shaw (Ned Cobb), will come as delightful surprises. The collection is rich in many ways but one of its greatest strength comes from the variety of perspectives offered but perhaps the most striking aspect of reading American Georgics is its undeniable relevance to our current political, economic, and agricultural moment.

Editors, Edwin C. Hagenstein, Sara M. Gregg, and Brian Donahue present the pieces in a fairly linear and chronological fashion beginning with the development of our nation’s identity and governance, and passing in turn through a burgeoning industrial economy, American Romanticism of the mid-nineteenth century, the advent of industrial agriculture, regional agrarian movements of the early to mid-twentieth century, and other back-to-the-land movements that would follow, and on through the current zeitgeist of locavores, school gardens, urban farmers, and the gourmetism of real food. The book is laid out in seven sections following these themes, introduced by a thoughtful essay on the grouping, and then each individual piece is preceded by a contextual biography of the author.

Continue Reading…

 

Faith And Trust

Liberty Hyde Bailey

Editor’s note: I re-encountered this poem earlier this week, and was struck by how poignant a response it held to all the recent controversy about Rob Bell’s new book Love Wins. Or, at least this is how I feel about it…

Two workmen true as I passed by
Announced what things beyond us lie,—
Two views that never can agree
Yet each one knew just what will be.
Of present days they were not sure
But each man’s future was secure,
For faith had set them both to know
Precisely how our destins flow.

But only this and this I know,—
That I am here and then I go.
I pass my work with hope and zest
And live my time as it seems best;
I live it full and drain it deep,—
’Tis well to live, ’tis vain to weep.
If there be things I cannot tell
The more I trust that all is well.
I take the cheer from daily lot
And for the rest I vex me not,
For what there is beyond the sod
I leave it all to Time and God.

— from Bailey’s collection of poems, Wind and Weather
(Doulos Christou Press reprint edition 2008)
Read the Book’s introduction here

Faith And Trust

Two workmen true as I passed by

Announced what things beyond us lie,

Two views that never can agree

Yet each one knew just what will be.

Of present days they were not sure

But each man’s future was secure,

For faith had set them both to know

Precisely how our destins flow.

But only this and this I know,

That I am here and then I go.

I pass my work with hope and zest

And live my time as it seems best;

I live it full and drain it deep,

Tis well to live, ’tis vain to weep.

If there be things I cannot tell

The more I trust that all is well.

I take the cheer from daily lot

And for the rest I vex me not,

For what there is beyond the sod

I leave it all to Time and God.

 

As our Advent gift to you, we will be uploading the audio recordings from the main sessions of the “A Rooted People: Church, Place and Agriculture in an Urban World” conference. (Click here for the conference website and more info on the conference).

Click for previous installments in this series:
[ Part #1 – Ragan Sutterfield / Fred Bahnson ]
[ Part #2 – Martin Price / Sean Gladding ]
[ Part #3 – Claudio Oliver / Martin Price ]

Talk #7 –Saturday  Afternoon Keynote.
“The 2050 Scenario—Peak Oil, Peak Food, Peak… Church?” – Fred Bahnson
Fred is a writer and co-founder of Anathoth Community Garden.

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As our Advent gift to you, we will be uploading the audio recordings from the main sessions of the “A Rooted People: Church, Place and Agriculture in an Urban World” conference. (Click here for the conference website and more info on the conference).

Click for previous installments in this series:
[ Part #1 – Ragan Sutterfield / Fred Bahnson  ]
[ Part #2 – Martin Price / Sean Gladding  ]

Talk #5 –Saturday – Morning Intro.
“The Three WHY’s” – Claudio Oliver
Claudio lives, farms and writes as part of a church community in Curitiba, Brazil.

Talk #6 – Sat. Morning Keynote
“Growing Food on Rooftops and Other Hard-to-Grow Places”
– Martin Price

Martin is the former Director of Educational Concerns For Hunger Organization (ECHO) in Ft. Myers, FL.

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As our Advent gift to you, we will be uploading the audio recordings from the main sessions of the “A Rooted People: Church, Place and Agriculture in an Urban World” conference.  (Click here for the conference website and more info on the conference).

[ Click here for the first installment of these recordings… ]

Talk #3 – Keynote Talk
“Introduction to ECHO
” – Martin Price
Martin is the former Director of Educational Concerns For Hunger Organization (ECHO) in Ft. Myers, FL.

Talk #4 – Evening Storytelling
“The Story of God, The Story of Us”
– Sean Gladding

Sean is a member of the Communality community in Lexington, KY and author of the new book THE STORY OF GOD, THE STORY OF US  (Read our review… ).

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As our Advent gift to you, we will be uploading the audio recordings from the main sessions of the “A Rooted People: Church, Place and Agriculture in an Urban World” conference.  (Click here for the conference website and more info on the conference).

Talk #1 – Opening Session
“Humility” – Ragan Sutterfield

Ragan is a farmer and writer from Little Rock Arkansas, and author of  Farming as A Spiritual Discipline (Click here for our review…)

Talk #2 – Keynote Talk
“Lords, Priests, and Lovers (or Three Ways to Become a Master Gardener)”
– Fred Bahnson

Fred is a writer and co-founder of Anathoth Community Garden

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