Archives For 9/11

 

“Reflecting on Christian Faithfulness
in a Post-9/11 World”

A review of
Who Is My Enemy?:
Questions American Christians Must Face
about Islam — and Themselves
.
by Lee Camp.

Review by Chris Smith.

Lee Camp - Who is my Enemy?Who Is My Enemy?:
Questions American Christians Must Face
about Islam — and Themselves
.
Lee Camp.
Paperback: Brazos Press, 2011.
Buy now: [ ChristianBook.com ]

This weekend marks the tenth anniversary of the tragedies of 9/11. In the days that followed, as we learned more about the men who coordinated the hijackings of planes and who crashed – or intended to crash – these planes into strategic landmarks including the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, there was a huge public outcry, not only against al-Qaeda, the terrorist group who claimed responsibility for the events of the day, but also against the Muslim faith at large. Public opinion of the Muslim community ranged from suspicion to vilification in those days and months following 9/11, which fueled rhetoric that can generally be characterized as depicting a grand conflict between Islam and the West.

As we remember, however, the events of a decade ago, it would serve us well to reflect on the emotions and rhetoric that prevailed in the American public in the months after 9/11. For those of us in the Church, one very helpful tool for such reflection is Lee Camp’s new book, the title of which asks the pointed question Who is My Enemy? Camp is professor of theology and ethics and Lipscomb University in Nashville who earned his PhD as a student of John Howard Yoder at Notre Dame, but is perhaps best known these days as the creator and organizer of the Tokens “Old Time Radio” stage show (Click here for our review of an earlier Tokens show). Camp is also the author of Mere Discipleship, which offers a poignant and compelling call to radically Christ-centered life in the contemporary world.

Continue Reading…

 

Hauerwas - War and the American DifferenceAlthough it will not hit the shelves of bookstores until early October, Stanley Hauerwas’s newest book promises to be useful in helping churches think about Christian faithfulness in the United States in a post-9/11 world.

War and the American Difference:
Theological Reflections on Violence and National Identity
.
Stanley Hauerwas.
Paperback: Baker Acadmic, 2011.
Pre-order now: [ Amazon – Paperback ]


Read an excerpt from this book on the Baker website!

 

In addition to the books reviewed above (Lee Camp’s WHO IS MY ENEMY? and Miroslav Volf’s ALLAH), here are a few books that would be useful in helping churches to reflect on what Christian faithfulness looks like in a post-9/11 world).

(Your purchase of any of these books helps to support the work of the ERB!  Thanks…)

834877: The War on Terror: How Should Christians Respond? The War on Terror: How Should Christians Respond?

By Nick Solly Megoran / InterVarsity Press

$1.99 —  *** SALE PRICE ***

432316: Christian Attitudes to War, Peace, and Revolution Christian Attitudes to War, Peace, and Revolution

By J.H. Yoder;
T.J. Koontz & A. Alexis-Baker, eds. / Brazos Press

$23.49

[ Read our review… ]

834900: The Gods of War: Is Religion the Primary Cause of Violent Conflict? The Gods of War:
Is Religion the Primary Cause of Violent Conflict?

By Meic Pearse / InterVarsity Press

$3.99 – *** SALE PRICE ***

208984: The Crusades Through Arab Eyes The Crusades Through Arab Eyes

By Amin Maalouf / Random House, Inc

$11.99

171420: Christianity and the Crisis of Cultures Christianity and the Crisis of Cultures

By Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger / Ignatius Press

$9.99

523700: The Saint and the Sultan: The Crusades, Islam, and Francis of Assisi"s Mission of Peace The Saint and the Sultan:
The Crusades, Islam, and Francis of Assisi’s Mission of Peace

By Paul Moses / Random House, Inc

$16.99

[ Read an  excerpt…]

 

The 911 Campaign for the Christian Peacemaker Teams.

By Shane Claiborne / Jonathan Wilson-Hartgrove.
26 August 2009

As we remember the eighth anniversary of the September 11, 2001, we join our voices with the psalmist in a cry of lament: “How long, O Lord, until Abel’s blood stops crying, until justice rolls down like waters, until the lion can lay down with the lamb in a restored creation?” We lament the violence suffered by 9/11 victims and their families. And we lament the violence that people in Afghanistan and Iraq have suffered these past eight years. We cry out against the violence, and we want to act now for peace.

A couple of decades ago our brother Ron Sider made the following statement: “Making peace is as costly as waging war. Unless we are prepared to pay the cost of peacemaking, we have no right to claim the label or preach the message.” Before long the Christian Peacemaker Teams was born. CPT has been interrupting injustice and respectfully partnering with local nonviolent movements in some of the toughest corners on the planet for years. CPTers radiate the sort of courage and imagination we need if we are to expect folks to take our cross seriously in a world riddled with terror and smart bombs. For this reason, many of us have joined delegations like the one we went to Iraq with in March of 2003.

This sort of Christian “witness” is marked by the truth at the center of the Christian message – greater love has no one than those who are willing to lay down their lives for others. There is something worth dying for, but nothing worth killing for. No doubt, CPT is a new face of global missions in a world of omnipresent war—a witness to the God that loves evildoers so much he died for them, for us. These days, the cross presents a beautiful alternative to the sword. Continue Reading…