Christian Intentional Community – A Reading List

October 25, 2018

 

Last weekend, we hosted the annual retreat of the Nurturing Communities Network (NCN) here at Englewood Christian Church.

 

NCN is

“an informal and growing network of Christ-centered intentional communities. Older established communities connect with novice communities for the purpose of learning from each other, encouragement and growing.  This happens through visits, regional and local gatherings, meals together, and many conversations.  The hope is mutual encouragement in Jesus’ way of simplicity, justice and peace.”

 

I was inspired by this retreat to compile the following list of books that offer diverse perspectives on life in Christian intentional community. (Some of these titles are recommended on the NCN Resource list.)
 
If you are curious about Christian intentional community, I encourage you to take a look at some of these books, and the NCN website.

 

By ERB Editor C. Christopher Smith

   [easyazon_image align=”center” height=”500″ identifier=”1573225843″ locale=”US” src=”http://englewoodreview.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/51CBQMPDjML.jpg” tag=”douloschristo-20″ width=”327″]

[easyazon_link identifier=”1573225843″ locale=”US” tag=”douloschristo-20″]The Cloister Walk[/easyazon_link] 

Kathleen Norris

Why would a married woman with a thoroughly Protestant background and often more doubt than faith be drawn to the ancient practice of monasticism, to a community of celibate men whose days are centered on a rigid schedule of prayer, work, and scripture? This is the question that poet Kathleen Norris asks us as, somewhat to her own surprise, she found herself on two extended residencies at St. John’s Abbey in Minnesota.

Part record of her time among the Benedictines, part meditation on various aspects of monastic life, The Cloister Walk demonstrates, from the rare perspective of someone who is both an insider and outsider, how immersion in the cloistered world– its liturgy, its ritual, its sense of community– can impart meaning to everyday events and deepen our secular lives. In this stirring and lyrical work, the monastery, often considered archaic or otherworldly, becomes immediate, accessible, and relevant to us, no matter what our faith may be.

READ an excerpt of this book… 

 

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