Archives For VOLUME 11

 

Wesleyan Theology
that Yearns for Justice

A Feature Review of

No Religion but Social Religion: Liberating Wesleyan Theology
Joerg Rieger

Paperback: GBHEM Publishing, 2018
Buy Now:
Amazon ] [ Kindle ]
 
Reviewed by Joseph Johnson

 

Liberation theology is often seen largely as a Roman Catholic movement born out of the socioeconomic struggles of the 1960’s and 1970’s in Latin America. There is, of course, much truth in this characterization, though liberation theology’s scope now extends well beyond Latin America when viewed in contemporary global perspective. In his introduction to The Cambridge Companion to Liberation Theology, Christopher Rowland echoes the words of pioneering Peruvian theologian Gustavo Gutiérrez when he points out that part of the significance of liberation theology for the wider Church has been its willingness to take on the challenge of “speaking of God in a world that is inhumane.” And in a world marked by so much suffering and injustice, this is clearly a necessary task.

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Here are 5 essential ebooks on sale now that are worth checking out:
( Walter Brueggemann, Ta-Nehisi Coates, Bonhoeffer, MORE )

Each week, we carefully curate a handful of books for church leaders that orient us toward the health and the flourishing of our congregations.

Via our sister website Thrifty Christian Reader
To keep up with all the latest ebook deals,
be sure to connect with TCR via email or on Facebook
 

 

#1:
Money and Possessions: Interpretation: Resources for the Use of Scripture in the Church 

Walter Brueggemann

*** $4.99 ***

Very helpful book on how we read scriptural passages about money and possessions!

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Frank Wilczek

Five New Must-Listen Podcast Episodes!!!
Frank Wilczek, Jen Hatmaker,
David Sedaris, Bonnie Kristian, MORE

 

These podcasts can be downloaded from the iTunes store
or from the links below.

 

< <<<< The Previous Vital Conversations Post

 
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Saturday, June 16, is the birthday of John Perkins, Civil Rights activist and founder of the Christian Community Development Association (CCDA)… 

 

In honor of his birthday, here are seven videos which serve as a fine introduction to his life and work… 

 

My Story:

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Audiobooks are a great way to enjoy books while you are on the go!

While these audiobooks are available through Audible.com, we encourage you to check for them at your local library, where you may be able to listen to them for FREE!

If you find yourself regularly purchasing audiobooks from Audible, you might want to sign up for a subscription,
$14.95/month, plus two FREE audiobooks for signing up!

 

[ SIGN UP NOW ]

Here are the best audiobooks that will be released this month…
(Some of these are new books, others are older books just released as audiobooks)

  

Inspired: Slaying Giants, Walking on Water, and Loving the Bible Again 

Rachel Held Evans

Read by: The Author
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The Tools We Need to Get Started
 
A Review of 
 

Critical Theology: Introducing an Agenda for an Age of Global Crisis
Carl Raschke

Paperback: IVP Academic, 2016.
Buy Now:
Amazon ]  [ Kindle ]
 
Reviewed by Lyle Enright
 
 

The early Church Father Tertullian famously asked, “What has Athens to do with Jerusalem?” Carl Raschke, professor of religious studies at the University of Denver, takes a hard look at this question and what it means for us in Critical Theology: Introducing an Agenda for an Age of Global Crisis. Where Tertullian wondered what secular philosophy could possibly contribute to the Kingdom of God, Raschke isn’t at all sure that the Kingdom can survive much longer without a powerful dose of philosophical education, specifically from a Marxist perspective. It is thus no accident that the “critical theology” he proposes looks a lot like the “critical theory” of the Frankfurt School, a German intellectual heritage whose history he explores throughout this book’s six chapters.

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This is a fascinating and timely new book…
 

The Heritage: Black Athletes, a Divided America, and the Politics of Patriotism
Howard Bryant

Hardback: Beacon Press, 2018
 
Buy Now:
Amazon ]  [ Kindle ] [ Audiobook ]

 

Listen to an excellent NPR interview with the author:

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Tomorrow (June 12) is the release date for Rachel Held Evans’s new book. ENTER NOW to win a copy of this excellent book!  

 
We’re giving away FIVE  copies of:

Inspired: Slaying Giants, Walking on Water, and Loving the Bible Again

Rachel Held Evans

Thomas Nelson, June 2018

 

Enter to win a copy of this book!
(If you’ve already ordered a copy,
enter to win a copy for a friend…)

 
Enter now to win (It’s as easy as 1, 2, 3!) :
 
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Dallas Willard’s unfinished masterpiece, was finished after his death by three of his students and is being published later this month.
 

The Disappearance
of Moral Knowledge

Dallas Willard
(Edited and Completed by Steven Porter, Aaron Preston, and Gregg Ten Elshof)

Hardback: Routledge, June 2018
Buy Now: [ Amazon

 

This is a very expensive academic book (if you’re interested in it and cannot afford a copy, maybe your local public or university library can purchase a copy).

The publisher has graciously released a 99-page excerpt from the book to give readers a substantial taste for the book’s contents.
Continue Reading…

 

“God Does Not Leave Us Comfortless.”
 
A Feature Review of 
 

Open to the Spirit :
God in Us, God with Us, God Transforming Us
Scot McKnight

Paperback: Waterbrook, 2018
Buy Now: [ Amazon ]  [ Kindle ]
 
Reviewed by Julie Sumner
 
 

            Let it come, as it will, and don’t
            be afraid. God does not leave us
            comfortless, so let evening come.

                                    -Jane Kenyon

 
In Kenyon’s poem, “Let Evening Come,” she touches on a belief deeply held by Christians from all streams of the church: that God does not leave us without comfort. In each church that I have been a part of, whether Southern Baptist, Reformed Presbyterian, Episcopal, or non-denominational, that comfort is seen as a characteristic of the third member of the Trinity, the Holy Spirit. And yet despite this belief, as widely held as it is in the church, there is a pittance of instruction given about how to engage this comfort, this power, this person, that is otherwise so deeply affirmed by so many.

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