Archives For VOLUME 10

 

The Urban Problem of Affordability

A Review of

The Creative Destruction of New York City: Engineering the City For the Elite
Alessandro Busà

Hardcover: Oxford UP, 2017
Buy Now: [ Amazon ]  [ Kindle ]

 

Reviewed by Thomas V. Bona

 

When I last visited my native New York City in 2013, I made sure to walk on the High Line. I was stunned at how well the vaunted 1.45-mile greenway on an abandoned rail line on the west side of Manhattan lived up to the hype. Lush vegetation – and did I hear birdsong? – stood out over oceans of urban pavement. A literal park in the sky, it had food, drinks, art installations, and excellent people watching. I never would have explored this part of the city when I was growing up in the 1980s and 1990s, when it was mostly aging industrial buildings, garages, and night clubs. Now it was teeming with life, as were a lot of other neighborhoods. With the “back to the city” trend and the strength of New York’s economy, decades of urban decay and disinvestment were beaten back. There were record numbers of residents, jobs, and tourists. What’s not to like?

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What Psychology and the Church
Can Teach Each Other About Virtues

A Review of

The Science of Virtue: Why Positive Psychology Matters to the Church
Mark R. McMinn

Paperback: Brazos Press, 2017
Buy Now:  [ Amazon ]  [ Kindle ]

 

Reviewed by Alisa Williams
 

Author Mark McMinn begins his book The Science of Virtue with a personal anecdote that sets the stage for the following chapters: when he was preparing to leave for graduate school, a concerned couple from his church approached with a dire warning that to pursue a degree in clinical psychology would likely cause him to abandon his faith.

It’s a story that rings familiar to many Christians who have pursued degrees in the sciences, myself included. Even as an undergraduate studying psychology at a Christian college, I was told my chosen degree would lead me away from God.

The Christian church has had a tense relationship with science for centuries (to put it mildly), but McMinn’s intriguing look at positive psychology is an effort to reinforce the delicate bridge between the two.

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Here are 5 essential ebooks on sale now that are worth checking out:
( Hauerwas, Tolkien, L’Engle,
 MORE )

 

Via our sister website Thrifty Christian Reader
To keep up with all the latest ebook deals,
be sure to connect with TCR via email or on Facebook

   

#1:
Hannah’s Child: A Theologian’s Memoir 

Stanley Hauerwas

*** $1.99 ***

 

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Here are 10 notable people who died in 2017…

Some were theologians, others were writers or entertainers who have shaped our work. They all will be missed!

Brian Doyle
(Writer)


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Walking Forward Into the Future
 
A Review of 

The Last Arrow:
Save Nothing for the Next Life

Erwin McManus

 
Hardback: WaterBrook, 2017
Buy Now: [ Amazon ]  [ Kindle ]
 
 
Reviewed by Andy Johnson III
 
 
While Erwin McManus was finishing his writing of The Last Arrow, the message of the book took on deeper meaning when he was diagnosed with cancer. Although he did not write the book intending to describe it as his “last arrow” processing this life-threatening situation accentuated the insight that we are all living with a terminal condition. The question is not if but when we will die. McManus writes, “It’s only when when we realize we are terminal that we start treating time with the respect it deserves.” (96)
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“Get Proximate to Suffering”
 
A Feature Review of

White Awake:
An Honest Look at What It Means to Be White

Daniel Hill

Paperback: IVP Books, 2017
Buy Now: [ Amazon ] [  Kindle ]
 
 
Reviewed by Justin Cober-Lake
 
 
CNN showed the terror happening in the park where I used to eat my lunch. It showed a man being beaten in the garage where I used to park for church. It showed a car attack on the street where I used to go for Chinese food and used books. My town Charlottesville turned into a danger zone before my eyes, and – while I was safely away on vacation – I tried to account for my friends who were downtown.

The events that happened last summer connect to public arguments over Confederate statues, similar to the debates taking place across the US South. The conversations after the tragedy of August 12 (and before that, during the previous election cycle) became more urgent, whether in home groups, bars, or Girl Scout meetings, or on social media. The urgency hasn’t helped the clarity; the same miscommunication continues, and the weight of the same conversations and same experience of talking past each other still lies heavy.

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Here are 5 essential ebooks on sale now that are worth checking out:
( Alan Jacobs, Arundhati Roy, Hidden Figures,
 MORE )

 

Via our sister website Thrifty Christian Reader
To keep up with all the latest ebook deals,
be sure to connect with TCR via email or on Facebook

  

#1:
Original Sin: A Cultural History

Alan Jacobs

*** $1.99 ***

 

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With 2018 almost upon us, here are the 30 new books that we are most eager to read…

Due to the nature of publishers’ catalogs, this list mostly cover just the first half of the year.  We will do a similar list in June for the second half of the year.
 

[ Top Ten -Pt A ] [ Top Ten- Pt B ] [ Faith-in-Practice ]
[ Theology ] [ Fiction ] [ Gen. Nonfiction ]
[ Poetry / Young Readers ]

TOP TEN (Part A):

These titles are arranged in alphabetical order by the author’s last name…

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Beyond Suburbia

A Review of

The Embrace of Buildings:
A Second Look at Walkable City Neighborhoods

Lee Hardy

Paperback: Calvin College Press, 2017
Buy Now: [ Amazon ]

 
Review by Erin F. Wasinger
 

When I moved a few years ago, I joked that I only knew my way around the city if all routes started at my front door. I saw my home on the map as if it were the center of a bicycle wheel, each spoke pointing to a different destination: store, church, schools, library. Until I internalized the city’s layout, each trip functioned as if the world revolved around my garage.

Many of us view our environments that way, much to the detriment of communities, Lee Hardy argues in The Embrace of Buildings: A Second Look at Walkable City Neighborhoods. A certain flavor of the American dream envisions a well-manicured lawn in suburbia, a fence separating the yard from the neighbors’. Hardy is as Copernicus, reminding readers that our enclaves aren’t the centers in our individual universes. Instead, he invites us to imagine ourselves orbiting a shared space: our cities.

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A Call for Adventure
 
A Review of 
 

Stay in the City:
How Christian Faith is Flourishing in an Urban World

Mark Gornik / Maria Liu Wong

Paperback: Eerdmans, 2017
Buy Now: [ Amazon
 
Reviewed by Kevin Book-Satterlee
 
 
Stay in the City is one of the most fun, quick, and inspiring little texts on urban mission. Gornik and Wong bring forth small anecdotes to narrate a grand emerging adventure. We often think of adventure as journeying out, into the unknown, but in the city, with all its change, the familiar becomes unkown and recycles back to familiarity once again. This is the adventure of urban mission, the complex intertwining, changing dance with rehearsed steps to developing beats. Staying in the City inspires dance-lessons and improvisation to tell the journey of what God is doing in our cities across the globe.
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