Archives For History

 


(I know that I’m jumping ahead of things a bit by posting this hymn during Lent, but it also is an important piece of Women’s History)
 
St. Cassiane was a ninth century Eastern Roman abbess, poet, composer, and hymnographer. She is one of the first medieval composers whose scores are both extant and able to be interpreted by modern scholars and musicians. Approximately fifty of her hymns are extant and twenty-three are included in Orthodox Church liturgical books. The exact number is difficult to assess, as many hymns are ascribed to different authors in different manuscripts and are often identified as anonymous (adapted from Wikipedia)
 

Other Women Saints
Whose Stories You Should Know

 

Hymn for
Holy Wednesday
St. Cassiane

 
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February 23 is the Feast Day of St. Polycarp of Smyrna, a martyr of the second century. In remembrance, we offer the story of his martyrdom…

The Encyclical Epistle
of the Church at Smyrna
Concerning the Martyrdom
of the Holy Polycarp

Modern paraphrase of a 19th century translation,
excerpted from [easyazon_link identifier=”0974479691″ locale=”US” tag=”douloschristo-20″]Water, Faith and Wood:
Stories of the Early Church’s Witness for Today[/easyazon_link]

C. Christopher Smith. Doulos Christou Press, 2003.

— PAGE 1 —

The following text tells the story of Polycarp’s martyrdom. Polycarp
was born in approximately 70 A.D. to a wealthy family. He
eventually was discipled by the Apostle John and later became the
bishop of Smyrna. His martyrdom took place in either 155 or 156,
and this text was recorded at some point after that date in the second
century.

The Church of God which sojourns at Smyrna, to the Church of God
sojourning in Philomelium, and to all the congregations of the Holy and
Catholic Church in every place: Mercy, peace, and love from God the
Father, and our Lord Jesus Christ, be multiplied.

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In honor of Black History Month, here are the stories of 10 African Saints. North American Christians know too little about the history of Christianity in Africa, so these stories are a great place for us to start learning!

If these saints were alive today, would they have dark skin and be recognized as black people? Perhaps, perhaps not. (See Was St. Augustine Black?)  But regardless these saints were all born in Africa, and played a vital role in the church on this continent.

Here are brief introductions to ten African saints (I use this term loosely to include other prominent women of faith, not just those who have been canonized by the Roman Catholic church) that you should be familiar with. 

The Ugandan Martyrs

1885-1887

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TODAY (Nov. 14) is the Feast Day (in the Anglican Communion) of Samuel Seabury.

Samuel Seabury (November 30, 1729 – February 25, 1796) was the first American Episcopal bishop, the second Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church in the United States of America, and the first Bishop of Connecticut. He was a leading Loyalist in New York City during the American Revolution and a known rival of Alexander Hamilton.
(via Wikipedia)

In honor of the occasion, we re-publish Seabury’s incisive tract, An Earnest Persuasive to Frequent Communion.

 
 

An Earnest Persuasive
to Frequent Communion

Addressed to those Professors of the
Church of England,
in Connecticut,
who neglect that
HOLY ORDINANCE.

Published New Haven, CT
1789

 

Brethren, beloved in Christ,

The title has informed you, that my design is to address you on the subject of frequent Communion in the Holy Eucharist, or Sacrament of the Body and Blood of Christ, commonly called, The Lord’s-Supper. The subject is an important one, and claims your serious attention: And the great neglect of the duty requires plainness of speech, and freedom of admonition on my part. I have, therefore, to request, that you will carefully read and consider what is here addressed to you: and bear patiently that plain dealing which proceeds only from a desire to stir you up to the practice of a duty which I suppose an indispensable one, and in the neglect of which you live in a constant state of sin against your God.

“Sin” said the apostle, “is the transgression of the law.” The will of God, when made known to us, is His law to us, and binds us in all cases whatsoever. Nothing is sinful any further than it is contrary to God’s will; and everything is sinful in the same degree that it is contrary to His will: For to contradict the will of God constitutes the nature and essence of sin.

The will of God is made known to us by Revelation, and is declared in the Holy Bible, which is intended by God to be the standard of our faith and practice, that we may know at all times what He requires us to believe and do.

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Today is All Saints Day …

The day in the church year in which we remember (that is, reconnect ourselves with) the faithful sisters and brothers in Christ who have gone before us.

Below you will find a selection of resources on our site that will help you connect to the stories of the saints. We recommend learning about a saint or two that you know little or nothing about…

 

Ten Women Saints Whose Stories You Should Know.

Here are brief introductions to ten women saints (I use this term loosely to include other prominent women of faith, not just those who have been canonized by the Roman Catholic church) that you should be very familiar with. There are so many more faithful women that could have been included on this list. With the focus here on history, I have limited myself to saints who have lived prior to 1900.
 
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Herbert Workman’s book, The Evolution of the Monastic Ideal (1913), is a classic work

that not only introduces the history of Christian monasticism, but also provides an account of the theological forces that guided this tradition.
 

We are pleased to offer this book as a FREE PDF ebook to download.

[ DOWNLOAD NOW ]

via Archive.org

 

From the book’s preface:

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Rabindranath Tagore

Rabindranath Tagore was a Bengali poet, and the first non-European to win the Nobel Prize in literature (1913)…

Today (August 7) marks the anniversary of his death in 1941

 

We offer this timely and provocative essay on the nation-state,
which is excerpted from his 1917 book NATIONALISM
(Available as a FREE ebook [easyazon_link identifier=”B00AQMPV1K” locale=”US” tag=”douloschristo-20″]for Kindle[/easyazon_link]
or in a variety of file formats from Project Gutenberg.)

 

Against the Nation-State
Rabindranath Tagore
(1917)

 

We delude ourselves into thinking that humanity in the modern days is more to the front than ever before. The reason of this self-delusion is because man is served with the necessaries of life in greater profusion, and his physical ills are being alleviated with more efficacy. But the chief part of this is done, not by moral sacrifice, but by intellectual power. In quantity it is great, but it springs from the surface and spreads over the surface. Knowledge and efficiency are powerful in their outward effect, but they are the servants of man, not the man himself. Their service is like the service in a hotel, where it is elaborate, but the host is absent; it is more convenient than hospitable.

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Peter of Luxembourg

Today, July 5, is the feast day of St. Peter of Luxembourg, a 14th century saint known for his extreme asceticism and also his extreme devotion to the poor and downtrodden.

 

“St. Peter teaches us how denying the self, rank, riches,
the highest dignities, and all this world can give,
may serve to make a Saint.”

 

His story… 

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St. Petronilla
 

Today, May 31, is the feast day of St. Petronilla, an early Christian saint, who died in Rome at the end of 1st century.

 

“She lived when Christians were more solicitous
to live well than to write much”

 

Her story… 

 
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St. Julia of Corsica

Today, May 23, is the feast day of St. Julia of Corsica, a martyr of the fifth century.

 

Her story… 

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