Archives For *Excerpts*

 

The finalists in the running for the National Book Award were announced earlier this month…

[ See the full list of finalists ]

 

If you are like us, then there probably are a number of these books that you haven’t read yet.

So, we thought we’d give you excerpts from ten of them to give you a taste of their contents.
These excerpts feature books from all four categories


The Association of Small Bombs: A Novel

Karan Mahajan

Viking

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One of the best new book releases of the last couple of weeks is:
 

Love, Henri:
Letters on the Spiritual Life

Henri Nouwen

 
Gabrielle Earnshaw, Editor
Hardback: Convergent Books, 2016
Buy now:  [ Amazon ]  [ Kindle ]
 
 
 

Read the editor’s preface to this collection, and Brene Brown’s foreword:

 
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Gerhard-Lohfink

Yesterday (Aug. 29) marked the birthday of theologian Gerhard Lohfink, one of the thinkers whose work has been most formative for us at Englewood Christian Church…

His work also was a major contributor to the theological foundation of my book Slow Church (co-written with John Pattison).
 

*** Read an excerpt from Lohfink’s most significant book, 
Does God Need the Church?

 
Here is a recent talk that Lohfink gave that has been translated into English and published by the Bruderhof in their Plough magazine
(If you know German, there is also a video recording of this talk…)
 
 

Did the Early Christians Understand Jesus?
Nonviolence, Love of Neighbor, and Imminent Expectation

Gerhard Lohfink

 

This is a translation of Gerhard Lohfink’s keynote address on November 21, 2015 at a conference commemorating Eberhard Arnold.

There are statements so ­bewildering that they are quoted again and again. Among these is a remark, now a century old, by the French biblical scholar Alfred Loisy: “Jesus proclaimed the kingdom of God – and what came was the church.” I’ll leave to the side the question of what Loisy himself meant by this sentence. Rather, I’ll focus on how it’s understood by those who gleefully quote it. Usually, they understand it as bitterly ironic.

Here, on the one side, is the kingdom of God that Jesus proclaimed: the immense, all-comprehensive, yet incomprehensible trans­form­ation of the world under God’s reign – and there, on the other side, is the church that came after Easter: a finite body with all the limitations of any other social structure. Clearly, then, there’s a gaping chasm between Jesus’ proclamation and the post-Easter reality! Here the glory of the kingdom of God; there the bitter paltriness of the actual existing church.

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One of this fall’s best theology books is: 

Endangered Gospel:
How Fixing the World
is Killing the Church

By John Nugent

Paperback: Cascade Books, 2016.
Buy now:  [ Amazon [  Kindle ]

This is a provocative book that asks vital questions about how the church should live in the world, and how we bear witness to the good news of Jesus.

 

Watch an introductory video
and read an excerpt of the book:

*** ALSO, we are planning to do a month-long read-a-long discussion of this book in November, so get a copy and start reading now!
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In honor of the Feast Day of St. Augustine on this coming Sunday (Aug. 28), here is an excerpt from the excellent new book…
 

On Augustine
Rowan Williams

Hardback: Bloomsbury Continuum, 2016
Buy now:  [ Amazon ]  [ Kindle ]

 

*** Three Poems by St. Augustine *** 

 
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July 11 marks the 90th Birthday
of one of my favorite writers,
Frederick Buechner!

 

[ ENTER to win a copy of this book ]

 

In honor of the occasion,
here’s an Excerpt from
Buechner’s essay
“Faith and Fiction.”

 
 
This essay can be found in the new book:
Buechner 101:
Essays and Sermons by Frederick Buechner
Intro by Anne Lamott.
Buy now: [ Amazon ]  [ Kindle ]

 

If someone were to come up and ask me to talk about my faith, it is exactly that journey that I would eventually have to talk about—the ups and downs of the years, the dreams, the odd moments, the intuitions. I would have to talk about the occasional sense I have that life is not just a series of events causing other events as haphazardly as a break shot in pool causes the billiard balls to careen off in all directions but that life has a plot the way a novel has a plot, that events are somehow or other leading somewhere. Whatever your faith may be or my faith may be, it seems to me inseparable from the story of what has happened to us, and that is why I believe that no literary form is better adapted to the subject than the form of fiction.

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One of the best new releases of this month is…
 

A Small Porch:
Sabbath Poems 2014 and 2015

Wendell Berry

Hardback: Counterpoint Press, 2016
Buy now: [ Amazon ]  [  Kindle ]
 

Here’s an excerpt from the book…

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An excerpt from the excellent new book:
 

Setting the World on Fire: The Brief, Astonishing Life of St. Catherine of Siena
Shelley Emling

Hardback: St. Martins, 2016
Buy now: [ Amazon ]  [ Kindle  ]

 
*** Read a brief review
by ERB Editor Chris Smith

 
 

In the fourteenth century, Catherine’s public persona as a strong-willed woman   who never backed down was extraordinary to the point of being   freakish. At the time, women were so subservient to men that they   didn’t speak unless spoken to. And when they were spoken to, they   kept their eyes lowered. Legally, women were not allowed to appear in court. They weren’t allowed to hold any public, political or   professional office or to become a member of any of Italy’s influential guilds, such as the dyers’ guild Catherine’s father belonged to.   And they weren’t allowed to wear anything that was not of their   husband’s choosing. Women without brothers were able to inherit   land from their fathers, but they were forced to surrender it to   their husbands as soon as they married. Always, the law excluded   women as second-class citizens. “The good woman was invisible.   She wasn’t supposed to leave the house. She wasn’t even supposed   to be seen standing at the window of the house,” said Elizabeth   Petroff, a professor of comparative literature at the University of   Massachusetts, Amherst. “Yes, people looked askance [at Catherine], but she won them over, many times. She must have been just   what the times needed.”

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Ishi_portrait

 

Did you know that Thomas Merton wrote a book about Native Americans?

Ishi Means Man
Thomas Merton

Paperback Reprint: Paulist Press, 2015
Buy now:  [ Amazon ]  [ Kindle ]

Today marks the 100th anniversary of the death of Ishi, the last member of the Yahi, a group of the Yana of California. Widely acclaimed in his time as the “last wild Indian” in America, Ishi lived most of his life completely outside modern culture. (Wikipedia)

In the title essay of Merton’s book, he reflects of the genocidal tendencies of modernity.  Here are the opening pages of that essay…
 
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An excerpt from
this elegant new book…

And It Was Beautiful:
Celebrating Life in the Midst of the Long Good-Bye

Kara Tippetts

Paperback: David C. Cook, 2016
Buy now:  [ Amazon ]  [ Kindle ]

 

Life without a Bucket List

 
I can confidently say that I don’t live with a long list of things I want to do, see, or complete before I’m done in this place. I carried a dream for years of having a farm. I was in love with all things Wendell Berry. I could picture it, the life of routine created by the land and its rhythms. But beyond that I’ve never longed for having a list and checking things off. I’m happy with my old cars, my simple wardrobe, my lack of fancy things and vacations. Don’t get me wrong, I do love a good concert, but I also love an organic dance party in my kitchen. I love great food, but I also love a hot dog over the fire pit in my backyard. I love a hike in the mountains, but I also love a walk around the block with my people.

Last week, when I heard I may have another long road to travel on this journey, I turned to Jason and cried. I told him how day after day this place is losing its grip on me. Driving down the street this place sometimes feels so slutty, so wanting my money without a care for my heart. Billboards blare at me what to buy, what to think, how to vote. But the tie that binds me here is relationships. Sickness makes those bonds more real, more important. It’s people who grip my heart.

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