Archives For *Excerpts*

 

This new biography of Fred Rogers is one of 
this week’s best new book releases!
 

The Good Neighbor:
The Life and Work of Fred Rogers
Maxwell King

Hardback: Abrams, 2018.
Buy Now:
Amazon ] [ Kindle ]  [ Audible ]
 

Listen to an interview that
Maxwell King did with NPR station WNPR

 

Read an excerpt of the book,
the story of Fred Rogers’s appearance
on The Oprah Winfrey Show:

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Rabindranath Tagore

Rabindranath Tagore was a Bengali poet, and the first non-European to win the Nobel Prize in literature (1913)…

Today (August 7) marks the anniversary of his death in 1941

 

We offer this timely and provocative essay on the nation-state,
which is excerpted from his 1917 book NATIONALISM
(Available as a FREE ebook for Kindle
or in a variety of file formats from Project Gutenberg.)

 

Against the Nation-State
Rabindranath Tagore
(1917)

 

We delude ourselves into thinking that humanity in the modern days is more to the front than ever before. The reason of this self-delusion is because man is served with the necessaries of life in greater profusion, and his physical ills are being alleviated with more efficacy. But the chief part of this is done, not by moral sacrifice, but by intellectual power. In quantity it is great, but it springs from the surface and spreads over the surface. Knowledge and efficiency are powerful in their outward effect, but they are the servants of man, not the man himself. Their service is like the service in a hotel, where it is elaborate, but the host is absent; it is more convenient than hospitable.

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Hilaire Belloc

Hilaire Belloc is an often-overlooked Catholic writer of the early twentieth century.

 
Belloc was one of the most prolific writers in England during his lifetime. He was known as a writer, orator, poet, sailor, satirist, man of letters, soldier and political activist. His Catholic faith had a strong impact on his works. e was a noted disputant, with a number of long-running feuds, but also widely regarded as a humane and sympathetic man. His poetry encompassed comic verses for children and religious poetry. He also collaborated with G. K. Chesterton on a number of works. (Adapted from Wikipedia)
 
G.K. Chesterton wrote the following biographical sketch of his friend, as an introduction to the book, Hilaire Belloc: The Man and His Work by C. Creighton Mandell (FREE ebook edition available from Project Gutenberg). In honor of Belloc’s birthday on July 27, we reprint this brief essay.
 

 Hilaire Belloc:
A Biographical Sketch
by G.K. Chesterton

 
When I first met Belloc he remarked to the friend who introduced us that he was in low spirits. His low spirits were and are much more uproarious and enlivening than anybody else’s high spirits. He talked into the night; and left behind in it a glowing track of good things. When I have said that I mean things that are good, and certainly not merely bons mots, I have said all that can be said in the most serious aspect about the man who has made the greatest fight for good things of all the men of my time.

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I recently read this brief ebook, and appreciated the critical questions it posed:
 

Pooping Elephants, Mowing Weeds:
What Business Gurus Failed to Tell You

David George Moore

Ebook: Self-published, 2018
Buy Now: [ Kindle ]

 

How to Evaluate Business Books

An Excerpt 
(Reprinted with Permission of the Author)

 

Here are some diagnostic questions which should aid in deciphering the merits of any business book:

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Dallas Willard’s unfinished masterpiece, was finished after his death by three of his students and is being published later this month.
 

The Disappearance
of Moral Knowledge

Dallas Willard
(Edited and Completed by Steven Porter, Aaron Preston, and Gregg Ten Elshof)

Hardback: Routledge, June 2018
Buy Now: [ Amazon

 

This is a very expensive academic book (if you’re interested in it and cannot afford a copy, maybe your local public or university library can purchase a copy).

The publisher has graciously released a 99-page excerpt from the book to give readers a substantial taste for the book’s contents.
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This distinctive new book is both a poignant and funny teaching memoir, 
and a keen reading of William Shakespeare’s play ROMEO AND JULIET:
 

The Teacher Diaries:
Romeo & Juliet

Callie Feyen

Paperback: TS Poetry Press, 2018
Buy Now: [ Amazon ]  [ Kindle ]
 
 
 

An excerpt from this book:

 
It’s easy to wince when reading the Nurse’s debut scene. In fewer than fifty lines, we learn of her daughter’s death, and she shares the very palpable details of how she weaned Juliet, as well as her body’s reaction to that weaning. We learn that her husband is also gone, and we hear a little anecdote about Juliet’s toddler years. After my first reading of the Nurse’s speech, I wrote in the margin, “Girlfriend could’ve started a blog.”

Shakespeare’s Nurse is off-color, and she gives far more information than she needs to. She is also the person Juliet trusts most. When I teach Romeo and Juliet and we get to this part in the play, before we read, I give my students a warning.

“She says way too much, and she might make you squirm a bit.”

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Today is the birthday of social critic and media ecologist Neil Postman… 

In his most prominent book Amusing Ourselves to Death (1985), Postman described vividly the crumbling capacity for conversation in American society, a reality that has only expanded in the 30+ years since this book was published.
 

[ Martin Buber on the Virtues of Conversation ]

 

Here are 5 important passages from Amusing Ourselves to Death on the breakdown of conversation…

 

Americans No Longer
Talk to Each Other

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In addition to being Valentine’s Day and Ash Wednesday, today is the date attributed to the 200th anniversary of Frederick Douglass’s birth…

 
Here is Douglass’s scathing indictment of (white) American Christianity, which was published as an appendix to later editions of Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass
 

READ Paul Laurence Dunbar’s Poem
Frederick Douglass

 
I find, since reading over the foregoing Narrative, that I have, in several instances, spoken in such a tone and manner, respecting religion, as may possibly lead those unacquainted with my religious views to suppose me an opponent of all religion. To remove the liability of such misapprehension, I deem it proper to append the following brief explanation. What I have said respecting and against religion, I mean strictly to apply to the _slaveholding religion_ of this land, and with no possible reference to Christianity proper; for, between the Christianity of this land, and the Christianity of Christ, I recognize the widest possible difference–so wide, that to receive the one as good, pure, and holy, is of necessity to reject the other as bad, corrupt, and wicked. To be the friend of the one, is of necessity to be the enemy of the other. I love the pure, peaceable, and impartial Christianity of Christ: I therefore hate the corrupt, slaveholding, women-whipping, cradle-plundering, partial and hypocritical Christianity of this land.

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Love, Truth, and Conversation:
The Way Forward

 

C. Christopher Smith

 

The following is an editorial that will appear in the
Advent 2017 issue of our quarterly magazine.

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“The US is experiencing a deep epistemic breach, a split not just in what we value or want, but in who we trust, how we come to know things, and what we believe we know — what we believe exists, is true, has happened and is happening.”
– David Roberts, America is Facing An Epistemic Crisis, Vox.com

 

One of the most unsettling realities of Donald Trump’s presidency is his apparent assault on the institutions by which American society has traditionally measured and assessed truthfulness – particularly the institutions of science and freedom of the press. A cynic might posit that these institutions, and the truths that they uncover in the course of their work, might be taken as a threat to the interests of global corporations. Climate change, for instance, poses a threat to the coal and petroleum industries, and perhaps to a lesser extent the automotive industry and all its ancillaries. Undermine a society’s tools for discerning truth, the logic goes, and darkness prevails, along with all those who profit from darkness.

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Today is the release day for John Green’s new novel…

Turtles All the Way Down
John Green

Hardback: Dutton Books, 2017
Buy Now:  [ Amazon ]  [ Kindle ]
 

Listen to John Green reading the
first chapter from this new book… 

 
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