Archives For 2013 – Classics

 

Nectar to an Aching Soul

An essay on the classic novel

Franny and Zooey
J.D. Salinger

Paperback: Back Bay Books
Buy now:  [ Amazon ]

By Craig D. Katzenmiller

 

“I’m so horribly conditioned to accept everybody else’s values, and just because I like applause and people to rave about me. I’m ashamed of it. I’m sick of it. I’m sick of not having the courage to be an absolute nobody. I’m sick of myself and everybody else that wants to make some kind of splash.”

 
These are the words that Salinger puts on the lips of Franny Glass, a young university student who is rebelling against university life and one of the main characters in Franny and Zooey.
 
I was introduced to this book by a friend, who sent the above five sentence quote to me in an email. A D.Phil student in a German university at the time, I was growing frustrated with the whole academia scene, and these words were nectar to my aching soul. I sat with them as my wife and I made the decision to return to America in order to find fulfilling work. Upon my return to the States, Franny and Zooey was the first book I picked up.

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(Editor’s Note: We’ve had a lull in this series over the summer, but am glad to revive it now!)

In 2013, we are encouraging our readers to mix up their reading habits, and read (or re-read) classics in addition to new books, such as the ones we review here in the ERB.

Broadly speaking, a classic is any book that is not a new book, or in other words that is worth reading five, ten or even one hundred years after its initial publication. ERB Editor Chris Smith has an article on The Huffington Post website arguing for reading a mix of classics and new books in 2013.

 

We’ve asked a number of noted writers to pick the classics that they often return to, and we will be running these lists as a weekly feature on our website through 2013.

This week’s post in the series is by Brad Fruhauff.

Writers on the Classics:
[#1 – Shane Claiborne ] [#12 (Previous Post) – Tania Runyan ]

 

Brad FruhauffBrad Fruhauff is editor-in-chief of Relief: A Christian Literary Expression and teaches English at Trinity International University. His poems, stories, and reviews have appeared in Rock & Sling, Relief, ERB, catapult, Burnside Writers Collective, and The Ankeny Briefcase.

I tell my students that all writing has parameters and that they can use those parameters to learn discipline in their writing, so I tried hard, here, to abide by Chris Smith’s preference for titles in the public domain. There was also no attempt to define a “classic” other than as an older book to which I return often, so I felt free to interpret that broadly, though in the end the list may look pretty conventional. This, I think, is in the spirit of the question, which is about the persistence of books over time. But these really are books that I think of fondly or that marked significant moments in my personal, spiritual, and intellectual development. They are “classic” to me because I seem to be always talking about what is between their covers.

 


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Tania RunyanIn 2013, we are encouraging our readers to mix up their reading habits, and read (or re-read) classics in addition to new books, such as the ones we review here in the ERB.

Broadly speaking, a classic is any book that is not a new book, or in other words that is worth reading five, ten or even one hundred years after its initial publication. ERB Editor Chris Smith has an article on The Huffington Post website arguing for reading a mix of classics and new books in 2013.

 

We’ve asked a number of noted writers to pick the classics that they often return to, and we will be running these lists as a weekly feature on our website through 2013.

This week’s post in the series is by Tania Runyan.

Writers on the Classics:
[#1 – Shane Claiborne ] [#12 (Previous Post) – Brent Bill ]

 

Tania Runyan is the author of Second Sky (forthcoming from Antler in 2014), A Thousand Vessels (WordFarm), Simple Weight (FutureCycle Press) and Delicious Air (Finishing Line Press), which was awarded Book of the Year by the Conference on Christianity and Literature in 2007. Her poems have appeared in many publications, including Poetry, Image, Mid-American Review, Atlanta Review, Indiana Review, Harvard Divinity Bulletin, The Christian Century, Willow Springs, Nimrod, and the anthology In a Fine Frenzy: Poets Respond to Shakespeare. Tania was awarded an NEA Literature Fellowship in 2011. She tutors high school students and edits for Every Day Poems and Relief.

 


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Brent BillIn 2013, we are encouraging our readers to mix up their reading habits, and read (or re-read) classics in addition to new books, such as the ones we review here in the ERB.

Broadly speaking, a classic is any book that is not a new book, or in other words that is worth reading five, ten or even one hundred years after its initial publication. ERB Editor Chris Smith has an article on The Huffington Post website arguing for reading a mix of classics and new books in 2013.

 

We’ve asked a number of noted writers to pick the classics that they often return to, and we will be running these lists as a weekly feature on our website through 2013.

This week’s post in the series is by J. Brent Bill.

Writers on the Classics:
[#1 – Shane Claiborne ] [#12 (Previous Post) – Hannah Notess ]

 

J. Brent Bill is a writer, photographer, retreat leader, and Quaker minister, who has written and co-written many books including: Awaken Your Senses: Exercises for Exploring the Wonder of God and Sacred Compass: The Way of Spiritual Discernment.  Brent lives on Ploughshares Farm, which is fifty acres of Indiana farmland that is being reclaimed for native hardwood forests and warm season prairie grasses.  He blogs at Holy Ordinary.

 


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20130122_SPU_Response-Winter-2013_Hannah-Notess_Portrait_001In 2013, we are encouraging our readers to mix up their reading habits, and read (or re-read) classics in addition to new books, such as the ones we review here in the ERB.

Broadly speaking, a classic is any book that is not a new book, or in other words that is worth reading five, ten or even one hundred years after its initial publication. ERB Editor Chris Smith has an article on The Huffington Post website arguing for reading a mix of classics and new books in 2013.

 

We’ve asked a number of noted writers to pick the classics that they often return to, and we will be running these lists as a weekly feature on our website through 2013.

This week’s post in the series is by Hannah Faith Notess.

Writers on the Classics:
[#1 – Shane Claiborne ] [#12 (Previous Post) – Rachel Marie Stone ]

 

Hannah Faith Notess is managing editor of Seattle Pacific University’s Response magazine and editor of Jesus Girls: True Tales of Growing Up Female and Evangelical, a collection of personal essays. Her poems have appeared in The Christian Century, Slate, Rattle, and The Mennonite, among other publications. For more of her idiosyncratic book opinions, check out 30bookstoreadbefore30.wordpress.com. She lives in Seattle. (Photo credit: Luke Rutan).

 


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Since it is Holy Week this week, we are taking a break from our regular Writers on the Classics column.

As we take a sort of Spring Break, we thought it would be a good time to recap the series to date.  Be sure to check out any of the posts you might have missed!

In 2013, we are encouraging our readers to mix up their reading habits, and read (or re-read) classics in addition to new books, such as the ones we review here in the ERB.

Broadly speaking, a classic is any book that is not a new book, or in other words that is worth reading five, ten or even one hundred years after its initial publication. ERB Editor Chris Smith has an article on The Huffington Post website arguing for reading a mix of classics and new books in 2013.

We’ve asked a number of noted writers to pick the classics that they often return to, and we will be running these lists as a weekly feature on our website through 2013.

Here are the twelve posts in the series so far:

 Writers on the Classics

#1
Shane Claiborne
Author,
The Irresistible Revolution

 

#2
Karen Swallow Prior
Author, BOOKED

#3
Scott Russell Sanders
Award-winning
Essayist/Novelist

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Rachel Marie StoneIn 2013, we are encouraging our readers to mix up their reading habits, and read (or re-read) classics in addition to new books, such as the ones we review here in the ERB.

Broadly speaking, a classic is any book that is not a new book, or in other words that is worth reading five, ten or even one hundred years after its initial publication. ERB Editor Chris Smith has an article on The Huffington Post website arguing for reading a mix of classics and new books in 2013.

 

We’ve asked a number of noted writers to pick the classics that they often return to, and we will be running these lists as a weekly feature on our website through 2013.

This week’s post in the series is by Rachel Marie Stone.

Writers on the Classics:
[ #1 – Shane Claiborne ] [ #5 (Last Week) – Jen Pollock Michel ]

 

Rachel Marie Stone is the author of Eat With Joy: Redeeming God’s Gift of Food, just out from InterVarsity Press. She’s also the author of a book about Jesus for children with the working title God’s Upside-Down Kingdom, forthcoming from Olive Branch Books this year. Her writing appears in places like Christianity TodaySojourners, Books & Culture, The Huffington Post, The Christian Century, RELEVANTCatapult, The Suffolk Times, PRISM, The Progressive Christian, Creation Care Magazine, and Flourish Magazine. She’s a regular contributor to Christianity Today’s popular women’s blog, Her.meneutics, and tweets @rachel_m_stone.

 


 

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Jen Pollock MichelIn 2013, we are encouraging our readers to mix up their reading habits, and read (or re-read) classics in addition to new books, such as the ones we review here in the ERB.

Broadly speaking, a classic is any book that is not a new book, or in other words that is worth reading five, ten or even one hundred years after its initial publication. ERB Editor Chris Smith has an article on The Huffington Post website arguing for reading a mix of classics and new books in 2013.

We’ve asked a number of noted writers to pick the classics that they often return to, and we will be running these lists as a weekly feature on our website through 2013.

This week’s post in the series is by Jen Pollock Michel.

Writers on the Classics:
[ #1 – Shane Claiborne ] [ #5 (Last Week) – Amy Frykholm ]

Jen Pollock Michel is a writer, speaker, and mother of five. She is a member of Redbud Writers Guild and writes regularly for Christianity Today’s Her.Menuetics. Currently, she is working on a book manuscript called Found Wanting: At the Intersection of Faith and Desire. Jen earned her B.A. in French from Wheaton College and her M.A. in Literature from Northwestern University. She lives in Toronto, Canada, with her family and blogs at www.findingmypulse.com. You can follow Jen on twitter @jenpmichel.


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Amy FrykholmIn 2013, we are encouraging our readers to mix up their reading habits, and read (or re-read) classics in addition to new books, such as the ones we review here in the ERB.

 

Broadly speaking, a classic is any book that is not a new book, or in other words that is worth reading five, ten or even one hundred years after its initial publication. ERB Editor Chris Smith has an article on The Huffington Post website arguing for reading a mix of classics and new books in 2013.

 

We’ve asked a number of noted writers to pick the classics that they often return to, and we will be running these lists as a weekly feature on our website through 2013.

This week’s post in the series is by Amy Frykholm.

Writers on the Classics:
[ #1 – Shane Claiborne ] [ #5 (Last Week) – Doug Worgul ]

Amy Fykholm is Associate editor of The Christian Century, and regularly writes for a number of publications on religion, culture and spirituality. She is the author of three books in the field of religion and culture, ranging in subject matter from the end times to medieval mysticism to contemporary sexuality, but held together by their curiosity about the stories humans tell about God.  Read our review of her recent book Julian of Norwich: A Contemplative Biography.

 


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Doug WorgulIn 2013, we are encouraging our readers to mix up their reading habits, and read (or re-read) classics in addition to new books, such as the ones we review here in the ERB.

Broadly speaking, a classic is any book that is not a new book, or in other words that is worth reading five, ten or even one hundred years after its initial publication. ERB Editor Chris Smith has an article on The Huffington Post website arguing for reading a mix of classics and new books in 2013.

We’ve asked a number of noted writers to pick the classics that they often return to, and we will be running these lists as a weekly feature on our website through 2013.

 

This week’s post in the series is by novelist Doug Worgul.

Writers on the Classics:
[ #1 – Shane Claiborne ] [ #5 (Last Week) – John Wilson ]

Doug Worgul is the author of the Englewood Review’s 2012 Novel of the Year, Thin Blue Smoke. He was born into a family of preachers, teachers, and writers, in the state of Michigan. He now resides in Kansas City where barbecue and the blues are a way of life. A strong sense of place is a major theme in Doug Worgul’s fiction, as it has been in his career as a newspaper journalist and editor of regional and national magazines. He is a nationally-recognized authority on the history and cultural significance of American barbecue traditions. He is married and has four daughters.

 


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